1993 McLaren F1

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About This Car

- Quick Specs -

  • Make

    McLaren
  • Model

    F1
  • Year

    1993
  • Engine

    6.1L V12
  • 0-60 time

    3.200
  • HP

    627

The McLaren F1 is a super car designed and manufactured by McLaren Automotive. Originally a concept conceived by Gordon Murray, he convinced Ron Dennis to back the project and engaged Peter Stevens to design the exterior of the car. On 31 March 1998, it set the record for the fastest road car in the world, 240 mph (386 km/h). As of January 2011, the F1 is still the fastest naturally aspirated road car in the world.

The car features numerous proprietary designs and technologies; it was designed and built with no compromises to the original design concept laid out by Gordon Murray. It is lighter and has a more streamlined structure than even most of its modern rivals and competitors despite having one seat more than most similar sports cars, with the driver's seat located in the middle (and slightly forward of the passengers seating position providing excellent driving visibility). It features a powerful engine and is somewhat track oriented, but not to the degree that it compromises everyday usability and comfort. It was conceived, as an exercise in creating what its designers hoped would be considered the ultimate road car.

Chief engineer Gordon Murray's design concept was a common one among designers of high-performance cars: low weight and high power. This was achieved through use of high-tech and expensive materials like carbon fiber, titanium, gold, magnesium and kevlar. The F1 was the first production car to use a carbon-fiber monocoque chassis.

Chief engineer Gordon Murray's design concept was a common one among designers of high-performance cars: low weight and high power. This was achieved through use of high-tech and expensive materials like carbon fiber, titanium, gold, magnesium and kevlar. The F1 was the first production car to use a carbon-fiber monocoque chassis.

Source: Wikipedia, 2011

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