1975 Plymouth Fury

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In 1975, Chrysler moved the Fury nameplate to Plymouth's redesigned mid-size models that had previously been marketed as the Satellite. The "Road Runner" was offered as the top-line model of the redesigned coupe, but was moved to the Plymouth Volare line the following year. The full-sized Plymouth then became known as the Plymouth Gran Fury. The Gran Fury was dropped after 1977, and the mid-sized models were dropped after 1978, replaced in Canada by the rebadged Dodge Diplomat model called the Plymouth Caravelle (not the be confused with the E-body Plymouth Caravelle from 1983 to 1988). There was no 1979 Fury, Gran or otherwise.

Only minor styling changes were made between 1975 and 1978, most notably in 1977 from dual round headlights to a quad stacked square arrangement (see photo). Front turn signals moved from the outboard edges of the grille to cutouts in the front bumper. Tail lights added an amber turn lens in favor of the previous red. The 1975 Fury shared its B-body and unibody structure with the Dodge Coronet and the corporation's new personal-luxury coupes including the Chrysler Cordoba and Dodge Charger SE. Sedans and wagons, which continued with their basic 1971 bodyshells, rode on a 118 in (3,000 mm) wheelbase, while coupes — which were restyled with new and more formal sheetmetal and rooflines — rode on the 115 in (2,900 mm) wheelbase.

Fury was offered in three basic subseries for 1975 in sedans and coupes and two for the station wagon. The sedan was offered in base, Custom and Salon models, with interior/exterior trim ranging from austere to luxurious. The Salon featured plush velour bench seats with recliners and folding armrests and carpeted trunks, along with a spring-loaded hood ornament with the Plymouth logo. In addition to the Road Runner, the Fury coupes were offered in base, Custom and Sport models. The "Sport" was the top-line coupe featuring body pinstriping on the upper door and front and rear fenders, interiors with all-vinyl bucket seats and center cushion and armrest, or optional center console; or split bench seats with armrest, along with plusher shag carpeting on floor and door panels plus lower door carpeting. The wagons were available as either the Fury Suburban or Fury Custom Suburban. Engine offerings included the base 225 in3 Slant Six which was standard on all models except Fury Sport, Road Runner and station wagons, all of which came with the 318 in3 V8 as the base engine which was optional on other models. Optional engines on all models included 360 and 400 in3 V8s with two- or four-barrel carburetor, and the 440 four-barrel was only as a "police" option on four-door sedans. Transmission offerings included a standard three-speed manual or optional TorqueFlite automatic.

Source: Wikipedia, 2012

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