1931 Chrysler Imperial Sedan

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Although the first car bearing Walter Chrysler’s name was a medium-priced six, within two years he had introduced a prestige model, the E-80 Imperial. Chrysler applied distinctive touches to the Imperial to set it apart from other models, including bullet headlights and a scalloped radiator and hood reminiscent of Vauxhall.

In July 1930, Chrysler introduced the Series CG Imperial. Larger than its predecessor, its appearance had been completely transformed. The radiator shell had become a grille, boldly set out and canted back at a rakish angle, and a long hood gave extra prominence to the nose. Fenders were given flowing curves, the visual cue replicated in the Duesenberg-like bumpers, and headlights became sleeker. In place of the old six was an all-new straight eight. The Imperial line had been expanded to four production bodies and four cataloged custom styles by LeBaron. Most popular was the five-passenger Close-Coupled Sedan with blind rear quarters, in which race driver Harry Hartz set a number of speed records on Daytona Beach.

This car was auctioned off by RM Auctions in July of 2011 at The Inn at St. John's, Plymouth, Michigan.

384.8 cu. in. eight-cylinder L-head engine, four-speed manual overdrive transmission with free-wheeling, solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 145".

Source: RM Auctions

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